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Volkswagens Fun Theory Campaign

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Bob’s alarm goes off at 8 in the morning. He washes up, gets dressed for work and like a typical workday morning, he does not have enough time for breakfast. He takes the car to work and gets caught up in the always reliable early morning rush hour. Bob arrives at work and begins the 9-5 workday. The end of the workday doesn’t come soon enough and he’s back in his car stuck in the late afternoon rush hour on the way back home. After a less than appetizing dinner, a few sitcom reruns, Bob heads to bed ready to start the next day. Rinse and repeat.

While this may not be an accurate representation of your own life, we can all agree Bob could use a little more ‘fun’ in his life. In fact, I’m sure we all could use a little more fun in our lives. Volkswagen agrees. They have been sponsoring entrepreneurs to develop ideas on their Fun Theory: that something as simple as fun is the easiest way to change people’s behaviour for the better. Be it for yourself, for the environment, or for something entirely different, the only thing that matters is that it’s change for the better.

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Can we get more people to obey the speed limit by making it fun to do? This was the question Kevin Richardson (USA) answered and it was so good that Volkswagen, together with The Swedish National Society for Road Safety, actually made this innovative idea a reality in Stockholm, Sweden. Speed machines were stationed at major roads throughout the city and not only displayed your current speed but would give you a thumbs up if you were driving according to the speed limit. Not only that, speeders would be penalized with a traffic citation and funds collected would be pooled into a lottery. Drivers who obey the limit though would be put into the lottery pool and have the chance of taking home the proceeds of the lottery, ultimately rewarding speed-abiding drivers.

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The results? 28,457 cars passed the speed cameras over a three day period. Before the experiment, the average speed was 32 km/h in a 30km/h zone. After the experiment, speeds dropped to an average of 25km/h, a reduction of 22% in speed. So does the fun theory work? Volkswagen seems to think so.

Feel free to check out their other social experiments which include a fast lane slide over stairs, a bottle recycling arcade bin and the musical piano stairs. We hope it adds a little more fun in your day.

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